6 Tips for Better Business Blogging

Writing a business blog is an excellent way to build a positive online reputation. At ReputationDefender, we recommend blogging as a keystone strategy for all our business clients. Blog posts offer valuable information on issues related to your brand and let customers know why they should invest in your services. In addition to this, they help to build traffic to the company’s other pages, directing potential customers back to the official website and acting as fresh material to share across social media profiles.

How to Write an Effective Business Blog

So, how does one actually go about creating a business blog? What is the difference between this type of publication and a personal journal? What are the pitfalls to be avoided and how do you generate genuine readership?

Here are 6 tips that will help to answer these and other questions:

  • Brainstorm a List of Topics – Deciding what to write about can sometimes be the biggest challenge. Readers will be more interested if they feel you are invested personally, but at the same time it’s important to maintain a level of professionalism and stay focused on topics that are relevant to the industry. Write a list of questions about the company: What does it do? How did it start? What challenges do staff face on a typical day? What are your goals for the future? The answers to these questions will start to uncover a wealth of business-related blog topics.
  • Plan the Blog – Once you generate a list of possibilities, plan the first few months of posts in a way that will makes sense to readers. Include at least one company origin story that offers a window into your (or the founder’s) inspiration. A behind the scenes look at how staff serve customers on a daily basis is also helpful. From there, move on to more technical posts that focus on industry trends or specific products. If there are any special company events coming up, plan to cover them with a blog post. Stick to a regular update schedule, whether it’s daily, weekly, or monthly, so readers know when to look for new content.
  • Choose the Style – A business blog should let customers get to know you on a personal level, while at the same time remaining formal enough to generate a sense of professional authority in your field. The exact style depends on your personality, the company’s overall vibe and the type of reader you want to attract. It’s fine to employ one or several ghost writers who are able to match the style and tone you want, but make sure you personally double checks posts to avoid publishing mistakes that could cause reputation damage.
  • Create a Formula that Works – Not every blog post needs to look the same, but it helps to stick with a general formula so readers know what to expect. This will also make it easier and quicker to write the posts. Draw readers in with an engaging story. Lay-out the problem as well as how your company can fix it. Add a Call to Action sending customers to the page you want, whether it’s the company’s website or a special offer page. Add interesting details so customers don’t feel like the post is just an advertising gimmick. Numbered lists or bullet-points help to format content in a way that is easy to follow and has been proven to boost traffic.
  • Vary Post Length – Anywhere from 300-2,000 words can be an effective length for business blogging. Different readers will be attracted to different types of content, so it’s a good idea to vary length, but most typical posts should be between 500 and 750 words. Interesting content is more important than length.
  • Use Click Generating Titles – A viral headline is what will get a blog post to rank where customers will see it. Using a numbered list is one of the best ways to attract readers. Directly addressing the reader and offering a concrete promise (such as ‘how to improve your blogging ability’) has also been shown to be effective. Beyond this, using emotion-generating superlatives, like ‘amazing’, ‘inspiring’ or ‘unique’, helps to attract the reader’s attention. Don’t resort to click-baiting, since this won’t attract long-term readers and may even end up hurting the company’s reputation. Make sure the content follows through on the headline’s promise.

Even the most interesting, well-written, relatable content won’t attract readers by itself, so it’s important to promote the blog once it’s written. Run a marketing campaign across all channels including the website, social media profiles, email signature and physical location if there is one. Promote the blog at all events so it really becomes part of the company’s personae. Once you generate a regular readership, posts will rank higher and they will be seen by more people. Popular posts can generate traffic over an extended period of time, so it’s well worth the initial effort to get the ball rolling.

Online Reputation – Don’t Forget to Manage Your Review Responses

Reputation management has a lot of similarities to online marketing, but it doesn’t stop there. Building a professional website, writing blog articles, and running an advertisement campaign are all important aspects of ORM. Yet beyond this, companies need a structured plan for building lasting relationships through online customer interaction.

Reviews Are Important

At ReputationDefender, we assist clients with generating and ranking positive content, but unfortunately, a few negative reviews can quickly undo all your hard work. Today’s customers are looking for more than brand generated content. They also want to see what kind of experience past customers have had. Studies have shown that 90 percent of customers read online reviews before trying a business for the first time, while 88 percent will trust these reviews the same as an in-person or word-of-mouth recommendation. This can translate directly into profits; businesses that receive predominately positive reviews see a 31 percent increase over those that don’t, while just one negative review can cost a company about 30 customers.

It’s Hard to Control What People Say

It’s hard to control who writes reviews on the internet, which can leave business leaders feeling somewhat helpless. Customers who’ve had a very memorable experience, either positive or negative, are more likely to take to the internet to express their feelings, and since many people tend to notice negative experiences more often than positive ones, online reviews don’t often represent a good cross-section of a business’s customers.

You can change this, as we mentioned in an earlier post, by generating more reviews. If every customer writes an honest critique, you’ll likely get a lot of positive comments (assuming the business is doing a good job overall) as well as a few pointers about where to improve. But even with the best review campaign, the majority of people visiting the site will still be there to read what others say, not to contribute.

Company Responses Make a Difference

This makes it very important for businesses to participate in the conversation taking place on review sites. Responses posted directly to this page will be read by everyone. Even if you don’t change the mind of the person who originally gave your business a negative rating, you can show other customers that you take feedback seriously and are sincerely trying to do a good job. Professional responses can often make you appear the more reasonable party.

Any serious ORM campaign needs to include a strategy to manage reviews, especially the company’s responses to reviews. The wrong response can generate more negative attention than the original comment, yet the right one offers a way to undo a lot of the damage and build a better, more honest relationship with customers. Managing reviews isn’t a job to be delegated to a college intern who happens to be handy on the web. It needs to be handled by a professional, preferably someone with real experience and standing in the company.

Planning a Response Strategy

Managing reviews is just like managing other aspects of your reputation. It needs a well thought-out plan, good writing and online communication skills, and of course technical tools to avoid missing content. Your response strategy will need to answer these four questions:

  • How do you keep track of reviews? – There are a lot of review sites on the internet and even with a full-time team it’s impossible to keep track of them all. It’s easy to set up a Google Alert for the brand name and any other relevant keywords. Other software is available with more complex capabilities that will let you monitor social media sites as well.
  • Which reviews are you responding to? – Don’t just respond to negative reviews. It’s important that people who write positive feedback feel their comments are also important to you. You should aim to respond to about 99 percent of reviews, even if it’s just a simple thank you.
  • Who writes responses? – Designate a person or a team to write responses. It helps if a high ranking executive or manager responds to at least some comments so it’s obvious the entire organisation is taking part in the feedback effort. Given time constraints, it may not be possible for this person to write every response, but make sure all team members have clear instructions about the style and content expected so the responses have a similar tone.
  • How will you respond to customers who are dissatisfied? – It’s never a question of if you will get a negative review, but when. It’s important to take these comments as constructive criticism and not react defensively. Some customers may bring up real areas where the company could improve, while others may be hard to please in any circumstances. Either way, write a short polite response within a few days. Take ownership of the problem. Explain what happened, and also what action has been taken to prevent to the issue from occurring again. Compensation can be appropriate in some cases if the customer experienced a loss of time and/or money.

If you stick to your response strategy, you’ll be able to build on positive reviews and avoid sustaining too much reputational damage from negative ones.

Knowing you have the ability to dilute the effect of hurtful comments just by how you respond makes online feedback feel far less threatening.

Reputation Management for 2017

Every year, reputation management becomes an even more important part of building a successful business. In 2017, it’s almost impossible to attract clients without an online presence, and entrepreneurs who fail to take control of their company’s reputation early will find themselves at a disadvantage.

Reputation Matters

People are expressing themselves more than ever on the internet and they’re also increasingly turning to other people’s comments to decide if a product or service is worth buying. 64 percent of marketing executives worldwide say “word of mouth” advertising is more important than other forms of marketing. On a personal level, we’re often taught not to worry too much about what others think of us, but what people say about your business will have real consequences when it comes to revenue. Company leaders can’t afford to not pay attention or to not care. They must take an active role in promoting the company through all internet platforms.

5 Reputation Management Questions to Ask in 2017

At ReputationDefender, we assist businesses with building or maintaining their online reputation. Reputation management is a growing field that changes regularly as search engine algorithms are updated and SEO techniques evolve. Yet there are some basic elements that every entrepreneur should consider if they want their company to keep expanding in 2017.

Here are five basic reputation management questions, as well as some of the ways companies can answer them:

  • What are people saying about my business? – There’s a lot of negativity on the internet. People are comfortable saying things online that they wouldn’t say in person, and sometimes this manifests as unreasonable rants about businesses or services they feel have let them down. As a business owner, it’s easier and more comfortable to just avoid reading these comments, especially since they tend to detract from our confidence in the company. Unfortunately, the last customer’s rant may be the first thing the next person researching your business sees. If you can’t delete the comment, you can at least respond politely and appropriately, so that it will be obvious you’re not the party being unreasonable. Sometimes customers also complain about real issues, so it’s crucial to take comments as constructive criticism and use them to improve.
    1. Google Alerts – A Google Alert for your name, the brand’s name and any related keywords will let you know any time someone leaves a comment on the website or another review site. This will allow you to respond appropriately.
    2. Social Media – Unfortunately, Google doesn’t index social media pages so if someone rants about your company on Instagram or Facebook it won’t be picked up by a Google alert. There are lots of social media listening tools, like Geopiq for Instagram, Reddit Keyword Monitor Pro, Hootsuite and Reputology, just to name are few. Some are free, while others come with a minimal cost. Of course you still won’t be able to respond to a private social media post, but the more tools you have at your disposal, the better the chances of catching a bad comment or review before it does too much damage.
  • What are people saying about competitors? – Don’t feel guilty about eaves-dropping on your competitors. The internet is a public place, so the information is available to everyone, just as your reputation is available to competitors. If online reviews give your top competitor four stars and they only give you three, which business will the next client choose? Probably not yours, unless there are some other mitigating factors. It’s as important to follow competitor’s reviews and comments as your own, so you can see what appeals to customers and work on imitating it. Give customers a reason to pick you over your competitor, whether it’s a different service, a better price, or just higher quality.
  • Is your website attracting clients? – The official company website is the key to attracting clients. It needs to be professional, informational and easy to navigate. It also needs to be optimized to appear at the top of the search result page for your brand. Most website platforms will offer tools to analyze traffic and let you know whether you’re attracting clients who spend time reading material. If the results are unsatisfactory, consider getting a professional SEO audit to figure out what isn’t working and improve on it.
  • What is not managing your reputation costing you? – Many entrepreneurs think that reputation management costs too much or takes too much time. However, once damaging material appears online, it could reduce profits almost immediately, especially if there isn’t already positive material ranking right alongside the negative reviews. The time and money it takes to build a positive reputation is much less than the cost of trying to fix a damaged reputation after the fact.
  • Do I need a professional reputation management service? – This question has to be answered individually for each company. Large companies may hire their own reputation management team as a division of online marketing. Small or midsize companies should consider working with a professional service unless one of the founders already has experience with reputation management or SEO. Many entrepreneurs may feel they can go it alone to start with, but reputation management can be very time consuming and as the company grows there will quickly be too much to do. Working with professionals from the start will help to give the company the best chance of success.

For more information or answers to further reputation management questions, contact our experts at ReputationDefender.

Why Do I Need to Know About SEO?

With Google’s algorithmic changes aimed at putting the user experience first, page optimization has become increasingly focused on content. Manipulative black-hat techniques, such as link generation and keyword stuffing, have fallen into the background, whilst well-written content and traditional marketing techniques have become key.

Yet the latest slogan, “Content is King”, undermines the important role technical SEO still plays in ranking a page. It’s true that well-written, original content is a must for today’s algorithms, yet with everyone on the internet focused on creating quality material, expert page mark-up, crawlability and optimal load-speed, these features are also needed to rank a page high on the SERP. At Reputation Defender, we help brands to build their reputation using all aspects of SEO; from quality content creation to running technical audits that analyze how the page is performing.

A Basic SEO Checklist

SEO isn’t something companies can just ignore. A thorough SEO check-up is a necessary part of building a website, since all the time and money will be wasted if Google can’t index the page and rank it where a potential customer will see it. Even for a small website, an SEO check-list constitutes a comprehensive task. Here is a basic overview of some of the most important areas:

  • On page SEO – This includes basic attributes such as the page title, meta description, headings, keyword usage and keyword density. A sitemap will help Google and other search engines navigate and index the website, while a Robot.txt file tells bots which pages to crawl. Text to code ratio, page requests, CSS and Google analytics tags must also be analyzed.
  • Speed Test – Page load speed is an important ranking factor for Google, so SEO needs to consider HTML page size, (around 33 kb if possible) and use Gzip code compression if necessary. Pages should contain a caching mechanism to load faster; the use of flash items should be avoided if possible since this will slow the page down. A Site Loading Test also needs to perform to verify load time.
  • Server and Security – Check URL and IP canonicalization to ensure that each page has its own unique URL and IP. Analyze security issues such as directory browsing, harmful botnet access and server signatures. The website should be “on the green side” for safe browsing, otherwise it could infect customers with a virus, making them unlikely to return.
  • Mobility – To succeed on today’s internet, websites need to be optimized for mobile devices and include Social API’s for major platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Google+ etc).
Auditing a Site

There are many reasons why a page that seems to be well-optimized may not be ranking. It could be due to content, website traffic, incoming links or other off-page factors, but this will be impossible to prove without first checking technical aspects related to indexing and ranking. Bad URL’s, incorrect internal linking, duplicate content or Schema marking are just a few of the reasons pages could fail to rank on the SERP.

Most SEO’s use software to perform a technical audit. These programs can crawl the webpages in a similar way to Google bots and highlight the issues that could be causing a problem. These are three choices site auditors might want to consider:

  • Screaming Frog – One of the most popular programs that is easy to use and free up to 500 pages.
  • ISS SEO Toolkit – A Microsoft based program that is slightly more in-depth for those possibly with more advanced SEO training.
  • SEMrush Site Audit – A valuable tool for analyzing site changes.

Software choices often depend on personal preference as well as the size and complexity of the site.

Technical Requirements of SEO

Today’s SEO’s need a lot of different skills, so good work usually results from collaboration between different members of a team. Writers and content editors need to develop articles that will draw in clients and encourage them to browse further through the website. Marketers promote products, construct a company image and establish connections. But without technical SEO analysis all these efforts will be ineffective at promoting content and building a positive online profile.

These are just a few of the topics modern SEO needs to be familiar with to analyze a page and improve SERP ranking:

  • DOM (Document Object Model) – A structured representation of a web-page that enables it to be read by scripts and programming languages.
  • Structured Representation of Data – An organized way of representing data that relies on protocols laid out on schema.org.
  • Critical Rendering Path – The method by which a page loads and is constructed or rendered into the browser.
  • Log File Analysis – Using the record of server requests to analyze how the site is being crawled by search engine bots.
  • JavaScript Framework – A popular website program that presents challenges for crawling and SEO.
  • HTTP/2 – A new web protocol that Google has been developing. It is likely to replace HTTP/1.1 which has been in effect since 1999.
Managing SEO Needs

Company founders have a choice to go it alone and become an SEO expert as they develop their website, or to invest in professional help. Time and financial constraints often create a part, as well an entrepreneur’s natural aptitude for this kind of work. However, as the company grows, the workload will almost inevitably become too great for one person and most organizations will need to invest in a professional team with the skill set to handle all aspects of SEO. Whatever the size of the company, no one should ignore SEO. It’s a vital part of building an online reputation and establishing a credible, professional image on the web.

ORM is Vital for Company Success

Online reputation management (ORM) has become better known over the past few years, yet not many people realize just how important it is when building a business. A positive internet reputation boosts credibility, increases sales and improves the overall image of a company. It’s one of the most important keys to a startup’s lasting success. With all this at stake, it’s worth making a considerable investment in reputation management. You can look at professional reputation management services offered by Reputation Defender.

How Does ORM Work?

Why is reputation management so important? Simply put, page one of your company’s Google search has become the modern version of a company brochure. It’s where customers go when they want to find out more about you. Yet unlike an in-house publication, business leaders don’t have absolute control over the content of the SERP. It contains feedback from customers and articles written by independent news sources, as well as the official website. This makes the SERP more vulnerable, but also more powerful. Business leaders often have to work quite hard to influence organic search results in their favor, but once they do, there will be a much higher chance of turning anyone casually researching the brand into a long term client.

The following types of SERP results are crucial to creating a revenue-generating reputation:

  • Credible Testimony – Today’s customers are more likely to trust the opinion of other consumers over what you say about yourself. Positive comments left by genuine clients will reinforce the company image and make it seem more trustworthy.
  • Positive Reviews – Consumers are more likely to buy a product if they can find reviews from other satisfied customers. Drawing four and five stars on well-known sites boosts sales more than any other single factor.
  • Personal Interaction – Even internet customers want to feel a personal connection with the businesses they patronize. Social media posts, blog articles and responses to comments and reviews all help to show there are real people who take pride in their work behind the company logo.
What Constitutes ORM?

ORM today is a multifaceted field that includes regular social media monitoring, responding appropriately to comments, blogging, news and website updates, as well as more technical SEO techniques. Today’s internet no longer functions from the “top down”, with business leaders informing customers about their company. It is a grass-roots environment in which everyone has a voice.

Businesses need to create the impression of transparency, allowing customers to feel involved with all parts of the process. Appropriate responses and honest admission of mistakes or lapses in services can minimize the impact of reputation-damaging material and is much more effective than lying to cover up the issue. Beyond this, ORM is about creating a deep reserve of positive, ranking content so that even when negative material makes it onto the SERP, it will be balanced by informational articles about the company and positive testimony from other customers.

ORM is a big task and businesses shouldn’t be afraid to ask for help. If you’re struggling to establish a positive online reputation for your business, consider working with our team at Reputation Defender.

UK E-mail: uksales@reputationdefender.com

Tel: (+44) 800 131 0700

US E-mail: support@reputationdefender.com

Tel: (888) 851-9609