5 Steps to Improve Your Restaurant’s Online Reputation

You might think that a restaurant’s online reputation is built on good food, but today this is only partially true. Of course, satisfying your customers’ taste buds is still a must, but any client experience starts with getting them through the door and this is becoming harder to achieve without a solid presence on the internet.

Today’s consumers make most of their choices based on information they find online, and this is especially true of restaurants. As far back as 2013, a study conducted by Single Platform found that 81 percent of consumers had searched for a restaurant on their mobile phone, while 92 percent had used a web browser, making restaurants easily the top, most-searched industry. Increasingly, consumers are adding detailed filters to their research, including cuisine type, location and price range. To succeed, you’ll need to appear where customers are looking, with a professional online profile that makes consumers want to pick you over a competitor.

Creating A Better Online Reputation

At ReputationDefender we help restaurants and other businesses build an online reputation that will increase their customer base and generate a positive buzz about the establishment. Whether you have just started a new business, or are trying to improve an existing reputation, our specialists can help create an online profile that will reach more people.

ORM for Restaurants

Here are some of the most important steps:

  • Professional Website – The design of your website can really make a difference by helping customers find the information they need quickly. Include pictures that show the ambience of the restaurant and the type of food you offer, but compress the images for a smooth load time, even on mobile. A sample menu helps customers get a feel for what you have to offer.
  • Create an Online Presence – Expand your internet presence beyond the website. Give the restaurant a social media profile on Facebook, Twitter and other popular sites and share news and updates on a regular basis. Write a blog focused on some of the foods and dishes you serve and other topics your customers may be interested in. Link all these pages to the website so it will be easy for a casual researcher to learn more about what you do.
  • Engage with Your Audience – Respond to comments as they appear. Even if feedback is negative, a professional response can help to undo the damage and make other customers realise you take their opinions seriously. People who feel they know you personally online will be more likely to become regular customers.
  • Put Technology to Work for You – There are many different programs which will make reputation management easier and less time consuming. A simple Google Alert lets you know when your brand is mentioned on Google. More sophisticated software, such as Hootsuite, will assist with regular social media updates. Other programs, like Upserve, are specifically geared toward restaurants, helping to manage everything from ordering to a personalised guest experience.
  • Ordering and Delivery Apps – Today many people don’t even want to go out to a restaurant, they want good food delivered to their door with minimal effort. Apps, such as Just Eat, will help you capitalise on this market by letting customers order and pay online. GrubHub research has shown that small restaurants often see a 50 percent increase in revenue when they invest in online ordering and delivery.

Leveraging the internet to create a better reputation will bring more local customers to your restaurant and increase the chances that travelling visitors will try out your cuisine. Even a small, family-owned restaurant or pub can’t afford to depend on people who’ve been coming for years. It’s important to make use of modern technology to attract today’s customers who are used to finding what they want online. For more information or tips on restaurant ORM, contact our experts at ReputationDefender.

Reputation Management for 2017

Every year, reputation management becomes an even more important part of building a successful business. In 2017, it’s almost impossible to attract clients without an online presence, and entrepreneurs who fail to take control of their company’s reputation early will find themselves at a disadvantage.

Reputation Matters

People are expressing themselves more than ever on the internet and they’re also increasingly turning to other people’s comments to decide if a product or service is worth buying. 64 percent of marketing executives worldwide say “word of mouth” advertising is more important than other forms of marketing. On a personal level, we’re often taught not to worry too much about what others think of us, but what people say about your business will have real consequences when it comes to revenue. Company leaders can’t afford to not pay attention or to not care. They must take an active role in promoting the company through all internet platforms.

5 Reputation Management Questions to Ask in 2017

At ReputationDefender, we assist businesses with building or maintaining their online reputation. Reputation management is a growing field that changes regularly as search engine algorithms are updated and SEO techniques evolve. Yet there are some basic elements that every entrepreneur should consider if they want their company to keep expanding in 2017.

Here are five basic reputation management questions, as well as some of the ways companies can answer them:

  • What are people saying about my business? – There’s a lot of negativity on the internet. People are comfortable saying things online that they wouldn’t say in person, and sometimes this manifests as unreasonable rants about businesses or services they feel have let them down. As a business owner, it’s easier and more comfortable to just avoid reading these comments, especially since they tend to detract from our confidence in the company. Unfortunately, the last customer’s rant may be the first thing the next person researching your business sees. If you can’t delete the comment, you can at least respond politely and appropriately, so that it will be obvious you’re not the party being unreasonable. Sometimes customers also complain about real issues, so it’s crucial to take comments as constructive criticism and use them to improve.
    1. Google Alerts – A Google Alert for your name, the brand’s name and any related keywords will let you know any time someone leaves a comment on the website or another review site. This will allow you to respond appropriately.
    2. Social Media – Unfortunately, Google doesn’t index social media pages so if someone rants about your company on Instagram or Facebook it won’t be picked up by a Google alert. There are lots of social media listening tools, like Geopiq for Instagram, Reddit Keyword Monitor Pro, Hootsuite and Reputology, just to name are few. Some are free, while others come with a minimal cost. Of course you still won’t be able to respond to a private social media post, but the more tools you have at your disposal, the better the chances of catching a bad comment or review before it does too much damage.
  • What are people saying about competitors? – Don’t feel guilty about eaves-dropping on your competitors. The internet is a public place, so the information is available to everyone, just as your reputation is available to competitors. If online reviews give your top competitor four stars and they only give you three, which business will the next client choose? Probably not yours, unless there are some other mitigating factors. It’s as important to follow competitor’s reviews and comments as your own, so you can see what appeals to customers and work on imitating it. Give customers a reason to pick you over your competitor, whether it’s a different service, a better price, or just higher quality.
  • Is your website attracting clients? – The official company website is the key to attracting clients. It needs to be professional, informational and easy to navigate. It also needs to be optimized to appear at the top of the search result page for your brand. Most website platforms will offer tools to analyze traffic and let you know whether you’re attracting clients who spend time reading material. If the results are unsatisfactory, consider getting a professional SEO audit to figure out what isn’t working and improve on it.
  • What is not managing your reputation costing you? – Many entrepreneurs think that reputation management costs too much or takes too much time. However, once damaging material appears online, it could reduce profits almost immediately, especially if there isn’t already positive material ranking right alongside the negative reviews. The time and money it takes to build a positive reputation is much less than the cost of trying to fix a damaged reputation after the fact.
  • Do I need a professional reputation management service? – This question has to be answered individually for each company. Large companies may hire their own reputation management team as a division of online marketing. Small or midsize companies should consider working with a professional service unless one of the founders already has experience with reputation management or SEO. Many entrepreneurs may feel they can go it alone to start with, but reputation management can be very time consuming and as the company grows there will quickly be too much to do. Working with professionals from the start will help to give the company the best chance of success.

For more information or answers to further reputation management questions, contact our experts at ReputationDefender.

How Can I Avoid a Phishing Attack?

Phishing attacks are scams that trick people into exposing financial details and other sensitive data. Phishing is not new; this type of online attack has been around almost as long as the internet, but today’s schemes are more sophisticated and harder to detect than ever. In the past, all but the most naïve could see through badly written requests to transfer money or suspicious-looking prize notices. This is not the case with modern phishing schemes which often resemble official communications so closely it’s hard to tell the difference. Some hackers take the time to learn co-worker’s names and personal details to make them appear even more convincing.

Phishing scams pose numerous risks. The most common scenario is a virus that will infect a computer through a contaminated link or a compressed document. Malware delivered through phishing can steal personal information, including financial details, or it may contain ransomware that will encrypt computer files and hold them hostage until you pay a fee. Most viruses have the ability to spread and infect an entire company network and businesses are frequently targeted since they have more resources and incentive to protect their data.

Falling prey to a phishing attack leaves a company vulnerable to financial theft, as well as leaks that could release trade secrets and confidential information. Compromising data released to the public causes reputational damage that’s hard to undo. Experts at Reputation Defender work to safeguard client reputations through regular privacy audits that catch problems as they emerge. We also help to repair online reputation by creating and promoting positive content.

Types of Phishing Attacks

There are basically two ways a hacker may design a phishing scheme:

  • Mass-scale phishing – A general attack that includes many different methods of communication. A lot like casting a large fishing net, mass-scale attacks do not target a specific person. However, they may include numerous semi-random attempts aimed at discovering the weakest link in a company’s network – the one employee gullible enough to click on a random link or reveal their password to a stranger.
  • Spear-phishing or Whaling – Spear-phishing is a targeted attack aimed at a specific person or a group of people. This type of phishing attack often includes details that make the included information seem legitimate. Emails can be designed to resemble personal office communication or a typical business invoice. Whaling is a type of spear-phishing that targets high-level personnel, particularly the CEO. Hooking these so-called “large fish” gives cyber criminals easier access to sensitive company data and financial accounts.
Methods of Delivery

Fraudsters have found even more creative ways to deliver links, through email, phone calls, text messaging and social media feeds.

Email phishing

A phishing email often looks like a generic notice from a well-known company or a bank. Cyber criminals have been known to copy logos from PayPal and eBay well enough to avoid detection. Typical scare tactics include warnings that the account is insecure, the password has been changed or there is a payment past due. Phishing emails usually include a CTA asking victims to click on a link or open an attached document. A targeted spear-phishing email may reference a colleague or a boss.

Things to look for – Many phishing emails still have small spelling mistakes or grammatical errors that a native speaker wouldn’t make, so this is the first thing to check. A missing email signature is another red flag or a form of address or writing style that’s not normal. Sometimes the only way to detect a phishing email is through slight changes in the email or domain name, such as the use of zeros instead of the letter “O” or “rn instead “m”. These can be easily missed, so if anything seems off, double-check the email address and domain name carefully.

Voice phishing – Vishing

Phone calls are another phishing technique (called vishing) which is aimed at getting individuals to hand over financial details or personal information. Like email phishing, vishing is often based on scare tactics that encourage victims to take action quickly without thinking about the consequences. Fraudsters may warn that a bank account is in danger or they may threaten legal action if a bill is not paid. Between 2013 and 2016, almost 900,000 people in the US received vishing calls purporting to be from tax collectors with IRS. These calls resulted in 5,000 victims with collective losses of USD $26.5 million.

Things to look for – Asking that bills be paid over the phone is unusual, so this should be an immediate warning. Banks also rarely ask for financial details or personal information over the phone. Don’t give details out unless you’ve made the phone call yourself to an official number and you know the counselor you’re speaking with well enough to recognize his or her voice. Other things to watch for are masked numbers or unknown caller ID.

SMS phishing – Smishing

Text messaging is another phishing technique that has come to be called smishing. Smishing messages often resemble phishing emails; they can come in the form of fake account notices with a CTA link. Some cyber criminals have even been known to use smishing to highjack a two-party identification system, first by requesting a password reset on your account, then sending a text asking for the code you just received in order to fix ‘’unusual activity” on that same account.

What to look for – Unusual or unfamiliar numbers should be a give-away, as well as unsolicited messages or codes you haven’t requested. Unless this is a company that normally sends texts, you should wonder why they are using this form of communication.

Social Media Phishing

Phishing schemes have also infiltrated social media. Fraudulent posts may claim you’ve won the lottery or ask you to click and sign up for membership. Targeted attacks often pretend to be from a friend who’s opened a second account. Some scams may even come from a regular account that’s been hacked.

What to look for – Watch for irregularities (why would a friend choose to open different account?) or language that doesn’t sound like the person you know. Be suspicious of sponsored posts from unknown businesses and links included in comments made by people you don’t know well.

Avoid Getting Hooked

Avoid all forms of phishing with these basic guidelines:

  • Don’t click on a link in an email or a text message unless you’re sure who the sender is.
  • Be wary of unsolicited messages and unusual account notices. Verify with the company before taking any action.
  • Always sign in to your accounts via a trusted app or by entering the URL in your browser. Don’t use an embedded link even if you think it’s legitimate.
  • Double-check any communication that’s doesn’t follow normal protocol. It never hurts to follow-up with an old fashioned phone call to make sure the message is from the real sender, especially if there’s money or confidential information involved.
  • Don’t transfer money without verifying who’s asking for it and where it’s going.
  • Don’t give out personal information over the phone.
  • Don’t fall for scams that seem too good to be true. They probably are.

How Can Social Media Help Business Strategy?

Social media is one of the most important, fastest growing parts of the internet. This term loosely refers to platforms and apps that allow users to create and share content, whilst at the same time participate in social networking. At first glance, social media might seem to be geared toward private individuals, but more and more businesses are finding these platforms to be a vital marketing asset.

Professional social media pages are key in any reputation management strategy. At Reputation Defender we help company brands to boost their online profile by improving search rankings and presenting a positive cohesive brand message. Official social media profiles are a target page one result, as well as a place to promote other content.

Social Media for Business

Business focused social media is all about using social channels to connect and engage with customers and build long term relationships. Of the many social media platforms, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are the most important for focusing an initial business strategy.

The social media audience is vast. Globally, 1.55 billion people use Facebook per month; about 72 percent of all people active on the internet. Of these, 70 percent say they interact on a daily basis. By contrast, only 38 percent of Twitter users and 22 percent of LinkedIn account holders are active daily. None the less, Twitter is one of the most popular microblogging platforms with 341 million active monthly users, whilst LinkedIn is largely seen as the most official social media business directory.

Facebook

A business Facebook profile offers a chance to interact with customers on a personal level via a trusted platform. Followers will begin to see the business in the same way they view their friends. They’ll look forward to regular posts that are genuine and thoughtful.

At the same time, Facebook offers a way for new clients to find out important details about your business such as location, history and contact info. It’s important to claim your brand name as a keyword and link back to the company website through your business profile. You can also add a “Like us on Facebook” button to the company website. Facebook will offer different templates depending on the type of business to let you target the audience you want to reach.

Many Facebook features are designed to make the platform accessible and useful for business purposes. Call to action buttons introduced in 2014 offer suggestions for customer activity such as “contact us”, “book now” or “sign up.” One click will take the client straight to the desired page, so this is a very effective way of driving traffic to your website. Typical business posts can share brand-based videos, images and blog articles. A Facebook page can also be used to advertise a special offer or promote client feedback. Sponsored advertising campaigns disseminate material even more efficiently and ensures that all followers see all your posts, while Facebook Analytics will help to pinpoint your current activity level and target improvement.

Twitter

Like Facebook, Twitter can be used to interact with customers, promote material and increase awareness for your product. A business profile should promote the business name, target an important keyword and link back to the official company website. A logo and other professional images can give the account a more personal touch.

Tweets can be leveraged for business purposes by promoting a specific marketing message. Tools such as TweetDeck and Periscope allow for multimedia tweets, while the hashtag system targets a specific topic zone. Like Facebook, Twitter offers paid advertising for businesses that want to maximize the marketing aspect of their account and Twitter Analytics offers tools for analyzing strategies and measuring success.

LinkedIn

As a professional networking site, LinkedIn carries more authority than Facebook or Twitter. This platform offers the opportunity to connect with colleagues and industry leaders, recruit potential employees and gain referrals. Managers will need a personal page to set up a business profile on LinkedIn, so this is the perfect opportunity to build your own career along with the company’s reputation. A Premium Account offers enhanced opportunities for profile viewing and targeted searches.

Like Facebook and Twitter, a business profile on LinkedIn should include all the company’s details and link back to the website. LinkedIn allows several different administrators, so it’s easy to delegate account management tasks to other employees. Showcase Pages on LinkedIn lets you target additional keywords and highlight specific company products and services. You can also post job applications and send targeted email marketing.

Fine-tune Your Profiles

In contrast to traditional advertising, social media is about connecting personally with customers whilst sharing the brand message. Especially on Facebook and Twitter, it’s important to strike a balance between promotion and providing genuinely interesting content that will make people want to follow your page.

  • Keep advertising in check – Out of 7 posts, only 1 should be obviously promotional.
  • Ask questions – Find out which industry related topics interest your followers the most.
  • Post fun facts – You’ll gain authority and help clients learn more about what you do.
  • Provide valuable tips – People will keep following to learn more.
  • Offer rewards – Organize a contest or offer points for virtual check-ins at your business.

A dedicated group of social media followers is a valuable reputational asset for any business. It increases customer retention and provides a long term client base which will help to counteract negative publicity in the future.