Phishing Scams Target Some of the Biggest Online Brands

phishing-scams

Amazon and PayPal are the best ways to make financial transactions online. WhatsApp is the secure messaging service with end to end encryption. Everyone uses Facebook and Gmail. What could go wrong?

If you think the best-known names on the internet are safe, it’s time to think again. Online criminals are getting smarter and sometimes the bigger the brand, the more worthwhile it is to invest in a scam that will actually fool people.

In the past, phishing emails were easy to spot, with bad grammar and spelling mistakes a native speaker wouldn’t make. Today, scammers not only use perfect English, they’ve often expertly matched the logo, style and URL, so it takes a careful comparison to see the difference. Meanwhile, legitimate sales platforms, such Facebook Marketplace, are full of people trying to convince you to hand over money for nothing in return.

Don’t assume anyone online is telling the truth unless you have verification from an independent source. It takes only a few seconds for hackers to steal financial details or infect your computer with malware that will allow them to access personal information. Help protect your privacy and safeguard the entire family’s reputation with ReputationDefender’s online privacy services. We’ll tell you about system vulnerabilities before they become a problem and help you deal with leaks after the fact. We’ll also keep you up-to-date on some of the most recent scams.

Companies to Double Check

Here are 6 well-known companies that have recently been targeted by scammers.

  • Amazon – Hackers have been sending convincing receipts for products that were never purchased complete with a link to follow if you want a refund. Don’t fall for it. Open a new browser window and sign into your real Amazon account to check your orders.
  • Apple – A group of scammers have been caught trying to convince people to pay off tax debt with iTunes gift cards. The message may come as a phone call, text or email claiming to be from the HMRC, but fraudsters ask for iTunes vouchers, which can be sold or traded anonymously, to pay off the overdue tax. The HMRC would never communicate in this manner and Apple doesn’t use iTunes as payment ‘outside of official stores’.
  • Facebook – Facebook Marketplace isn’t even a year old and it’s already full of scammers. Since there is no official payment method, it’s up to buyers and sellers to make an agreement. A number of fraudulent users have been insisting on payment via bank transfer, but once the money is turned over the product is never delivered and messages are blocked. Never agree to a bank transfer with someone you don’t know well; there are too many ways this can go wrong.
  • Google –A new Gmail scam has been scarily effective, even with tech savvy people who don’t usually fall for phishing. The trap appears to be an attached file from a contact, but instead it’s an embedded image which will take you to a Google sign-in window when you click on it. The window also appears legitimate, complete with ‘One Account, All of Google’ at the top of the page. However, once you enter your login details hackers have complete access to your account and start to target your contact list almost immediately. The only way to spot this scam is by noticing a subtle difference in the URL which begins with ‘data:text’ rather than ‘https’.
  • PayPal – Look for a warning that claims there’s been ‘unusual activity on your PayPal account’. The scammers have cleverly copied enough identifying marks to make the email look legitimate, but the clicking on the link will give them access to your account.
  • WhatsApp – WhatsApp users have reported messages claiming to offer free Sainsburys gift cards in celebration of new stores opening. Unfortunately the message has nothing to do with Sainsburys and clicking on the link will install malware that allows hackers to steal information from your phone.

New phishing scams appear all the time. Learning to recognise the signs will help protect your reputation and keep your information secure. For further questions or concerns about phishing scams, contact our experts at ReputationDefender.